Adopting from Cuba

The official flag.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.


Notice: As of July 14, 2014, all individuals and agencies facilitating international adoptions must be in compliance with the Intercountry Universal Accreditation Act.

The information contained on this website is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional legal advice. Always seek the advice of a licensed and qualified professional. While the content of this website is frequently updated, information changes rapidly and therefore, some information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies, omissions or typographical errors.


About Cuba

The native Amerindian population of Cuba began to decline after the European discovery of the island by Christopher COLUMBUS in 1492 and following its development as a Spanish colony during the next several centuries. Large numbers of African slaves were imported to work the coffee and sugar plantations, and Havana became the launching point for the annual treasure fleets bound for Spain from Mexico and Peru. To learn more please read About Cuba.


Hague Convention Information

Cuba is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, adoptions between Cuba and the United States are governed by the requirements of the Convention and the laws and regulations implementing the Convention in both the United States and Cuba.


The Department of State does not maintain files on the adoption process in Cuba because adoptions from Cuba are rare. Fewer than five adoptions by American citizen parents have taken place in the last five years. Please visit the Department's Country Specific Information sheets for more information on travelling to Cuba and the website of the U.S. Interest Section in Havana for information on consular services.


SOURCE

Intercountry Adoption, Bureau of Consular Affairs. U.S. Department of State Country Information[1]