Adopting from Ecuador

The official flag.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: [cia.gov].

Map.
Source: [cia.gov].

Basilica del Voto Nacional.
Source: Wikipedia.com.

The official coat of arms.
Source: Wikipedia.com.

Vicuña, one of two wild South American camelids. In the background the point on the Earth's surface that is farthest from the Earth's center, Chimborazo volcano.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Traditional Eucadorian dress at Carnival del Pueblo.
Source: Wikipedia.org.


Notice: As of July 14, 2014, all individuals and agencies facilitating international adoptions must be in compliance with the Intercountry Universal Accreditation Act.

The information contained on this website is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional legal advice. Always seek the advice of a licensed and qualified professional. While the content of this website is frequently updated, information changes rapidly and therefore, some information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies, omissions or typographical errors.


About Ecuador

What is now Ecuador formed part of the northern Inca Empire until the Spanish conquest in 1533. Quito became a seat of Spanish colonial government in 1563 and part of the Viceroyalty of New Granada in 1717. To learn more please read About Ecuador.


Ecuador Adoption Alert

There have been several Adoption Alerts for Ecuador over the years. To learn about these alerts please read Ecuador Adoption Alert.


Hague Convention Information

Ecuador is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, all adoptions between Ecuador and the United States must meet the requirements of the Convention and U.S. law implementing the Convention.


Ecuadorian law does not allow for an Ecuadorian child to travel to the United States to be adopted. Therefore, prospective adoptive parents must obtain a full and final adoption under Ecuadorian law before the child can immigrate to the United States.


Who Can Adopt

Adoption between the United States and Ecuador is governed by the Hague Adoption Convention. Therefore to adopt from Ecuador, you must first be found eligible to adopt by the U.S. Government. To learn more about this please read Who Can Adopt from Ecuador.


Who Can Be Adopted

Because Ecuador is a member of the Hague Adoption Convention, children from Ecuador must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for adoption. For example, the Convention requires that Ecuador attempt to place a child with a family in-country before determining that a child is eligible for intercountry adoption. In addition to Ecuador's requirements, a child must meet the definition of a Convention adoptee for you to bring him or her back to the United States. Learn more about the Convention's requirements for adoptable children.

How to Adopt

Adoption Authority

Ecuador's Central Authority


National Council of Childhood and Adolescence, (Consejo Nacional de la Niñez y Adolescencia, CNNA).

Address: Mariscal Foch E4-38 entre Colon y Cordero Quito, Ecuador

Ecuadorian Adoption Authorities

The National Adoption Direction, the Family Assignment Committee ( Comité de Asignación Familiar) and The Technical Adoptions Unit (Unidad Técnnica Adopciones)


The Process

Because Ecuador is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, adoptions from Ecuador must follow a specific process designed to meet the Convention's requirements. This process will follow six primary steps. You must complete these steps in the following order to meet all necessary legal requirements for adoption.


  1. Choose an Accredited Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt
  3. Be Matched with a Child
  4. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Immigration to the United States
  5. Adopt the Child in Ecuador
  6. Bringing the Child Home

To learn more about this process please read How to Adopt from Ecuador.

Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

A valid U.S. passport is required to enter and leave Ecuador. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports. To learn more please read about Traveling Abroad in Ecuador.


After Adoption

What does Ecuador require of the adoptive parents after the adoption?

In accordance with the International Adoption agreement, the Central Authority has the responsibility to periodically follow up on the residence and living conditions of the adopted children. The Central Authority will request annual reports from the international adoption agencies in accordance with international agreements. Ecuadorian adoption law stipulates that the follow-up report must be completed quarterly during the first year and every six months during the second year. Adoption follow-ups cease two years after the adoption date.


What resources are available to assist families after the adoption?

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family -- whether it's another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.


Here are some good places to start your support group search:


Adoption Services Support Groups for Adopting Persons

North American Council on Adoptable Children


NOTE: Inclusion of non-U.S. Government links does not imply endorsement of contents.


SOURCE

Intercountry Adoption, Bureau of Consular Affairs. U.S. Department of State Country Information[1]