Adopting from Honduras

The official flag.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

The official coat of arms.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Honduran rain forest.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

West Bay, Roatan, Islas de la Bahia.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Tegucigalpa Cathedral.
Source: Wikipedia.org.


Notice: As of July 14, 2014, all individuals and agencies facilitating international adoptions must be in compliance with the Intercountry Universal Accreditation Act.

The information contained on this website is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional legal advice. Always seek the advice of a licensed and qualified professional. While the content of this website is frequently updated, information changes rapidly and therefore, some information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies, omissions or typographical errors.


About Honduras (The Country)

Once part of Spain's vast empire in the New World, Honduras became an independent nation in 1821. After two and a half decades of mostly military rule, a freely elected civilian government came to power in 1982. During the 1980s, Honduras proved a haven for anti-Sandinista contras fighting the Marxist Nicaraguan Government and an ally to Salvadoran Government forces fighting leftist guerrillas. To learn more please read About Honduras (The Country). T


To read about the national anthem please read Honduran National Anthem.


To learn even greater detail about Honduras please read the Honduras Travel Fact Sheet.


Honduras Adoption Alert

There have been multiple adoption alerts for Honduras. To learn more please read the Honduras Adoption Alert page.


Hague Convention Information

Honduras is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, when the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force for the United States on April 1, 2008, intercountry adoption processing for Honduras did not change.


The adoption process in Honduras is currently in flux. Policies regarding eligibility requirements for prospective adoptive parents, residency requirements, and time frame are under review by the Honduran Family Court (IHNFA). Any change on the family code regarding all the above must be done by the Congress, not the family court, they can only give their opinion. This has been under review for more than 8 years, they have been studying many law projects, and however, it remains the same.


Who Can Adopt

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Honduras, you must be found eligible to adopt by both the U.S. and Honduran governments. The U.S. Government agency responsible for making this determination is the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

The Honduran Institute for Family and Children (IHNFA) is the Honduran government agency responsible for handling adoptions in Honduras.


Who Can Be Adopted

Honduras has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption. You cannot adopt a child in Honduras unless he or she meets the requirements.


Only children under 14 years of age can be adopted and need to be adopted through IHNFA. Children older than 14 only have to go through the family courts.


In addition to these requirements, a child must meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. law for you to bring him or her home back to the United States. Learn more about U.S. immigration requirements.


How to Adopt

Adoption Authority

Honduras' Adoption Authority

Instituto Hondureño de la Niñez y la Familia (IHNFA) and Honduran Family Court


The Process

The process for adopting a child from Honduras generally includes the following steps:


  1. Choose an Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt
  3. Be Matched with a Child
  4. Adopt the Child in Honduras
  5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Adoption
  6. Bring Your Child Home

To learn more about this process please read How to Adopt from Honduras.


Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

A valid U.S. passport is required to enter and leave Honduras. To learn more regarding travel please read Traveling Abroad in Honduras.


After Adoption

What does Honduras require of the adoptive parents after the adoption?

Currently, there are no specified post-adoption requirements. This may change as the intercountry adoption process is being reviewed by the Honduran Family Court. The family code already establishes that the adoptive parents must send the adoptive child follow ups, until the age of 14.


What resources are available to assist families after the adoption?

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family -- whether it's another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.


Here are some good places to start your support group search:


Adoption Services Support Groups for Adopting Persons

[http://www.nacac.org/ North American Council on Adoptable Children


NOTE: Inclusion of non-U.S. Government links does not imply endorsement of contents.


Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Honduras

Avenida La Paz Tegucigalpa, Honduras Tel: (504) 238-5114 ext. 4400 Email: usahonduras@state.gov Website: U.S. Embassy Honduras


Honduras' Adoption Authority

Instituto Hondureño de la Niñez y la Familia (IHNFA) Honduras, Centro America Tegucigalpa, Col. Humuya, Calle la salud, Apartado Postal 3234 Direct line (504) 235-3565 Fax: (504) 23.53.598 Website: Honduras Adoption Authority


Embassy of Honduras

3007 Tilden Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20008 Tel: (202) 966-7702 Email: embassy@hondurasemb.org Website: Embassy of Honduras


NOTE: Honduras also has consulates in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Jacksonville, Los Angeles, Miami, New Orleans, Phoenix, San Francisco, San Juan, and Tampa.


Office of Children's Issues

U.S. Department of State CA/OCS/CI SA-17, 9th Floor Washington, DC 20522-1709 Tel: 1-888-407-4747 E-mail: AskCI@state.gov Website: U.S. Department of State


U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)


For questions about immigration procedures, contact the National Customer Service Center (NCSC) at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).


Or, contact USCIS in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, at:


Tel: 011-504-236-9320 ext. 4500 Email: USCISTGU.Inquiries@dhs.gov

SOURCE

Intercountry Adoption, Bureau of Consular Affairs. U.S. Department of State Country Information[1]