Adopting from Mozambique

The official flag.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

Household women and girls take lunch of boiled sorghum.
Source: flickr.com.

Mount Murress.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

A boy in his classroom.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

View of capital city Maputo.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

A family in Nampula.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Makhuwa children in Nampula.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

The old cathedral of Quelimane.
Source: Wikipedia.org.


Notice: As of July 14, 2014, all individuals and agencies facilitating international adoptions must be in compliance with the Intercountry Universal Accreditation Act.

The information contained on this website is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional legal advice. Always seek the advice of a licensed and qualified professional. While the content of this website is frequently updated, information changes rapidly and therefore, some information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies, omissions or typographical errors.


About Mozambique

Almost five centuries as a Portuguese colony came to a close with independence in 1975. Large-scale emigration, economic dependence on South Africa, a severe drought, and a prolonged civil war hindered the country's development until the mid 1990s. The ruling Front for the Liberation of Mozambique (Frelimo) party formally abandoned Marxism in 1989, and a new constitution the following year provided for multiparty elections and a free market economy. To learn more please read About Mozambique.


Hague Convention Information

Mozambique is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption(the Hague Adoption Convention). To learn more please read about Mozambique and the Hague Convention.


Who Can Adopt

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, you must also meet multiple requirements in order to adopt a child from Mozambique. To learn more please read about Who Can Adopt from Mozambique.


Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, Mozambique has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption. To learn more please read about Who Can Be Adopted from Mozambique.


How to Adopt

Adoption Authority

Mozambique’s Adoption Authority

Social Services National Directorate (Direcção Nacional da Acçao Social)


The Process

The process for adopting a child from Mozambique generally includes the following steps:


  1. Choose an adoption service provider
  2. Apply to be found eligible to adopt
  3. Be matched with a child
  4. Adopt the child in Mozambique
  5. Apply for the child to be found eligible for orphan status
  6. Bring your child home

To learn more about this process please read How to Adopt from Mozambique.


Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

A valid U.S. passport is required to enter and leave Mozambique. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports. Getting or renewing a passport is easy. To learn more please read about Traveling Abroad in Mozambique.


After Adoption

The Government of Mozambique requires post-adoption monitoring until the child reaches 21 years of age. This requirement may be waived by the Juvenile court. However, the courts may not grant an adoption if the child will be immediately taken out of Mozambique.


We strongly urge you to comply with Mozambique’s post-adoption requirements in a timely manner. Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process. Your cooperation will contribute to that country’s positive experiences with American parents.


Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.


Here are some places to start your support group search:


Child Welfare Information Gateway

North American Council on Adoptable Children

Adoption Services Support Groups for Adopting Persons


NOTE: Inclusion of non-U.S. Government links does not imply endorsement of contents.


Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Mozambique

U.S. Embassy Consular Section Avenida Kenneth Kaunda 193 Maputo, Mozambique Tel: (258) 21 49 2797 Fax: (258) 21 49 0448 Email: ConsularMaputo@state.gov Internet: U.S. Embassy Mozambique


Mozambique’s Adoption Authority

Adoption information may be requested from this office by postal mail, international courier or phone using the following contact information Direcção Nacional de Acção Social Departamento da Crianca (Social Services National Directorate, Children’s Department) Av. Ahmed Sékou Touré 908, Tel: +258 21 350300/301 064 Ms. Francisca Sales is the Director of the Social Services National Directorate at the federal level.


Embassy of Mozambique

Embassy of the Republic of Mozambique 1525 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W. Suite 570 Washington, D.C. 20036 Tel: (202) 293-7146 Email: embamoc@aol.com


Office of Children’s Issues

U.S. Department of State CA/OCS/CI SA-17, 9th Floor Washington, DC 20522-1709 Tel: 1-888-407-4747 Email: AskCI@state.gov Internet: [1]


U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)

For questions about immigration procedures: National Customer Service Center (NCSC) Tel: 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833) Internet: USCIS


For questions about filing a Form I-600A or I-600 petition: National Benefits Center Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local) Email: NBC.Adoptions@DHS.gov

SOURCE

Intercountry Adoption, Bureau of Consular Affairs. U.S. Department of State Country Information[2]