Adopting from Oman

The official flag.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

Wadi Shab.
Source: Wikipedia.org.


Notice: As of July 14, 2014, all individuals and agencies facilitating international adoptions must be in compliance with the Intercountry Universal Accreditation Act.

The information contained on this website is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional legal advice. Always seek the advice of a licensed and qualified professional. While the content of this website is frequently updated, information changes rapidly and therefore, some information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies, omissions or typographical errors.


About Oman

The inhabitants of the area of Oman have long prospered on Indian Ocean trade. In the late 18th century, a newly established sultanate in Muscat signed the first in a series of friendship treaties with Britain. Over time, Oman's dependence on British political and military advisors increased, but it never became a British colony. To learn more please read About Oman.


Hague Convention Information

Oman is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, when the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force for the United States on April 1, 2008, intercountry adoption processing for Oman did not change.


The Department of State does not maintain files on the adoption process in Oman because adoptions from Oman are rare; fewer than five adoptions by American citizen parents have taken place since 2003. Please visit the Department's Country Specific Information sheets for more information on travelling to Oman and the U.S. Embassy Muscat Oman website for information on consular services.


SOURCE

Intercountry Adoption, Bureau of Consular Affairs. U.S. Department of State Country Information[1]