Adopting from Romania

The official flag.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

The Transfăgărășan in the Southern Carpathians
Source: Wikipedia.org.


Notice: As of July 14, 2014, all individuals and agencies facilitating international adoptions must be in compliance with the Intercountry Universal Accreditation Act.

The information contained on this website is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional legal advice. Always seek the advice of a licensed and qualified professional. While the content of this website is frequently updated, information changes rapidly and therefore, some information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies, omissions or typographical errors.


About Romania

The principalities of Wallachia and Moldavia - for centuries under the suzerainty of the Turkish Ottoman Empire - secured their autonomy in 1856; they were de facto linked in 1859 and formally united in 1862 under the new name of Romania. The country gained recognition of its independence in 1878. It joined the Allied Powers in World War I and acquired new territories - most notably Transylvania - following the conflict. To learn more please read About Romania.


Romania Adoption Alert

There have been multiple alerts for Romania regarding adoption over the years. To learn more please read the Romania Adoption Alert page.


Hague Convention Information

WARNING: Romania is party to the Hague Adoption Convention. Do not adopt or obtain legal custody of a child in Romania before a U.S. consular officer issues an "Article 5 Letter."


Romania is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention ). Therefore, all adoptions between Romania and the United States must meet the requirements of the Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA implementing regulations.


Romanian law currently prohibits intercountry adoption except by the grandparents, aunts, or uncles of a child. Please visit the Department's Country Specific Information sheets for more information on traveling to Romania and U.S. Embassy Bucharest's website for information on consular services.


Contact Information

Embassy of the United States of America

4-6, Dr. Liviu Librescu Blvd., District 1, Bucharest 015118 Romania Tel: (+40) 21 200-3300 Fax: (+40) 21 200-3442


Consulate of the United States of America

4-6, Dr. Liviu Librescu Blvd., District 1, Bucharest 015118 Romania Tel: (+40) 21 270-6000 Fax: (+40) 21 200-3505 E-mail Visas: VisasBucharest@state.gov E-mail American Citizens: acsbucharest@state.gov Consular Section


Romanian Adoption Authority

Romanian Office for Adoptions 47 Petofi Sandor Street District 1, Bucharest 011405, Romania Tel: (+40) 21 230-1351 Fax: (+40) 230-1320 E-mail: secretariat@adoptiiromania.ro Internet: Romanian Adoption Authority


Embassy of Romania

1607 23rd Street NW Washington, DC 20008 Tel: 202-332-4846, 4848, 4851, 4852, 2879; 202-232-4747 Fax: 202-232-4748 Email: consular@roembus.org Internet: Embassy of Romania


Office of Children's Issues

U.S. Department of State CA/OCS/CI SA-17, 9th Floor Washington, DC 20522-1709 Tel: 1-888-407-4747 E-mail: AskCI@state.gov Internet: U.S. Department of State


U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)

For questions about immigration procedures, call the National Customer Service Center (NCSC) at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).


SOURCE

Intercountry Adoption, Bureau of Consular Affairs. U.S. Department of State Country Information[1]