Adopting from Rwanda

The official flag.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

Rural children.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

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Source: Wikipedia.org.

Mountain gorillas in Volcanoes National Park.
Source: cia.gov.


Notice: As of July 14, 2014, all individuals and agencies facilitating international adoptions must be in compliance with the Intercountry Universal Accreditation Act.

The information contained on this website is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional legal advice. Always seek the advice of a licensed and qualified professional. While the content of this website is frequently updated, information changes rapidly and therefore, some information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies, omissions or typographical errors.


About Rwanda

In 1959, three years before independence from Belgium, the majority ethnic group, the Hutus, overthrew the ruling Tutsi king. Over the next several years, thousands of Tutsis were killed, and some 150,000 driven into exile in neighboring countries. The children of these exiles later formed a rebel group, the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF), and began a civil war in 1990. The war, along with several political and economic upheavals, exacerbated ethnic tensions, culminating in April 1994 in a state-orchestrated genocide, in which Rwandans killed up to a million of their fellow citizens, including approximately three-quarters of the Tutsi population. To learn more please read About Rwanda.


Rwanda Adoption Alert

There have been multiple adoption alerts over the years for Rwanda. To learn more please read that Rwanda Adoption Alert page.


Hague Convention Information

Rwanda is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption(Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoption processing in Hague countries is done in accordance with the requirements of the Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA's implementing regulations, as well as the implementing legislation and regulations of Rwanda.


The Hague Adoption Convention entered into force for Rwanda on July 1, 2012. However, the Government of Rwanda notified the U.S. Embassy in Kigali that the current suspension on intercountry adoptions will remain in effect until the country has a fully functional Hague Adoption Convention process in place. In October 2013, the Government of Rwanda informed the U.S. Embassy in Kigali that it is reviewing draft procedures, which if implemented, would permit it to lift this suspension. The Rwandan Government has not provided a timeline for this review or for implementation of the new procedures.


The Department of State will provide updated information on adoption.state.gov as it becomes available.


Please visit the Department's Country Specific Information for more information on travelling to Rwanda and the U.S. Embassy in Kigali's website for information on consular services.


Contact Information

Rwanda's Adoption Authority

National Commission for Children Kigali, Rwanda


U.S. Embassy in Kigali, Rwanda

2657 Ave. de la Gendarmerie Kigali, Rwanda Tel: 250 252 596 400 Email: consularkigali@state.gov Internet: U.S. Embassy in Rwanda


SOURCE

Intercountry Adoption, Bureau of Consular Affairs. U.S. Department of State Country Information[1]