Adopting from Serbia

The official flag.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

Church of Saint Sava.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Golubac Fortress.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

'
Source: flickr.com.

Merrillville - St. Elijah Serbian orthodox church.
Source: flickr.com.

Danube at the narrowest point of the Iron Gates, seen from the Serbian side.
Source: Wikipedia.org.


Notice: As of July 14, 2014, all individuals and agencies facilitating international adoptions must be in compliance with the Intercountry Universal Accreditation Act.

The information contained on this website is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional legal advice. Always seek the advice of a licensed and qualified professional. While the content of this website is frequently updated, information changes rapidly and therefore, some information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies, omissions or typographical errors.


About Serbia

The Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes was formed in 1918; its name was changed to Yugoslavia in 1929. Communist Partisans resisted the Axis occupation and division of Yugoslavia from 1941 to 1945 and fought nationalist opponents and collaborators as well. The military and political movement headed by Josip Broz "TITO" (Partisans) took full control of Yugoslavia when their domestic rivals and the occupiers were defeated in 1945. To learn more please read About Serbia


Serbia Adoption Alert

There have been multiple adoption alerts for Serbia over the years. To learn more please read the Serbia Adoption Alert page.


Hague Convention Information

Serbia is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Hague countries are processed in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Section 204.3 as it relates to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F).


NOTE: Adoption services in Serbia can be completed either through direct contact with the Serbian Ministry of Labor, Employment, and Social Policy (“Ministry”) or with the assistance of an authorized U.S. adoption service provider. Contact information for the Ministry is provided in the “Contact Information” section below. A small number of U.S. adoption service providers are authorized by the Ministry to provide services related to intercountry adoptions in Serbia. Prospective adoptive parents who decide to use an adoption service provider should verify the agency’s authorization by contacting the Ministry.


Who Can Adopt

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, you must also meet multiple requirements in order to adopt a child from Serbia. To learn more please read about Who Can Adopt from Serbia.


Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, Serbia has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption. To learn more please read about Who Can Be Adopted from Serbia.


How to Adopt

Adoption Authority

Serbia’s Adoption Authority

Ministry of Labor, Employment and Social Policy

The Process

The process for adopting a child from Serbia generally includes the following steps:


  1. Choose an adoption service provider
  2. Apply to be found eligible to adopt
  3. Be matched with a child
  4. Adopt the child in Serbia
  5. Apply for the child to be found eligible for orphan status
  6. Bring your child home

To learn more about this process please read How to Adopt from Serbia.


Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

A valid U.S. passport is required to enter and leave Serbia. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports. Getting or renewing a passport is easy. To learn more please read about Traveling Abroad in Serbia.


After Adoption

What resources are available to assist families after the adoption?

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family -- whether it's another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.


Here are some good places to start your support group search:


Child Welfare Information Gateway

North American Council on Adoptable Children

Adoption Services Support Group for Adopting Persons


Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Serbia

Address: Kneza Miloša 50 11000 Belgrade Serbia Tel: +381 11 361 9344 Fax: +381 11 361 5989 Email: Belgradeadoptions@state.gov Internet: U.S. Embassy Serbia


Serbia’s Adoption Authority

Ministry of Labor, Employment and Social Policy Address: Nemanjina 22-26 11000 Belgrade Tel: +381 11 363 1448 Email: socijalna_zastita@minrzs.gov.rs


Embassy of the Republic of Serbia

Address: 2134 Kalorama Rd., NW Washington, DC 20008 Tel: (202) 332-0333 Fax: (202) 332-3933 Email: info@serbiaembusa.org Internet: Embassy of the Republic of Serbia


Serbia also has consulates in New York and Chicago


Office of Children’s Issues

U.S. Department of State CA/OCS/CI SA-17, 9th Floor Washington, DC 20522-1709 Tel: 1-888-407-4747 Email: AskCI@state.gov Internet: U.S. Department of State


U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)

For questions about immigration procedures: National Customer Service Center (NCSC) Tel: 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833) Internet: USCIS


For questions about filing a Form I-600A or I-600 petition: National Benefits Center Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local) Email: NBC.Adoptions@DHS.gov

SOURCE

Intercountry Adoption, Bureau of Consular Affairs. U.S. Department of State Country Information[1]