Here at Adoption.com, we’ve gathered the best of our articles that have anything to do with transracial adoption. We hope you enjoy revisiting them!

Perspectives on Transracial Adoption

“Loss is inherent within any type of adoption. By definition, transracial adoptees lose their birth culture. In addition to losing our culture, there is an unspoken rule that adoptees should be grateful to [likely] climb the social ranks simply by being grafted in to a new family. However, we cannot leave our birth families lifestyles, class, race, and culture and simply enter another without confusion, anger, along with some pieces of thankfulness or gratitude. Transracial adoptees have to learn how to hold the privilege and burden of our many complex and crisscrossing narrative.” Transracial Adoptee Angela Tucker Shares Her Story

“I would like to believe that if adoptive parents adopt a child of a different race or culture, they will learn through positive or negative experiences that race may not matter to them, but it matters to their child and the world.” This Is Us Gets the Complexities of Transracial Adoption

“When you adopt a child transracially you must let your child be their own race. It is possible to treat them like they are yours biologically while still recognizing and accepting their heritage. It is an important part of who they are, and therefore should be important to you.” A White Sibling’s Perspective on Transracial Adoption: Part 1

Additional Articles

A White Sibling’s Perspective on Transracial Adoption: Part 2

A White Sibling’s Perspective on Transracial Adoption: Part 3

Transracial Adoption: An Adoptee’s Perspective

Transracial Adoptive Parents

“Transracially adopted children are often the minority in their neighborhoods and their schools. They don’t look like their parents. They might not look like their siblings. They may not have any friends who look like they do. This can be lonely and even confusing. This is why community “mirrors”—mentors for your child that are of their race—are so important.” Why Children in Transracial Adoption Need Community “Mirrors”

“As an adoptive mom, I desire for others to learn about the beauty of adoption. I am pro adoption-education. But I am also protective of my family. I want my son’s adoption story to be his own. So at times I struggle to find balance between sharing educational information and protecting my son’s privacy…” How to Answer Ignorant Questions about Your Adoptive Family

“Part of my purpose as a voice for transracial adoptees is to share the good and the bad. It is important that I show what could potentially happen so transracial families can avoid the mistakes our family made.” Avoid Creating an Invisible Child In Transracial Families

“You are no longer white. You become multiracial and multicultural when you adopt transracially. It is important to make this mental shift so that the needs of these children (and every member of the family) can most effectively be met; and so each family member has a better opportunity to reach their fullest potential.” Can White Parents Successfully Raise Kids Of Color?

“‘Blood doesn’t make a family,’ the popular adoption meme reads. How very true and poignant in the adoption community. Bringing a new child into your family, as joyous as that time may be, can lead to internal struggle within your family and friend groups, especially in cases of transracial adoption. [So] what happens when the rest of the family does not feel the same?” When Family and Friends React Negatively to Transracial Adoption

“The quickest cure for racism would be to have everyone in the country adopt a child of another race. No matter what your beliefs, when you hold a four-day-old infant, love him, and care for him, you don’t see color, you see a little person that is very much in need of your love.” What to Tell Someone Who is “On the Fence” About Transracial Adoption

Additional Articles

What I Wish Your Child Knew About Transracial Adoption

Honoring Your Child’s Birth Culture: Cultural Art To Add to Your Home

3 Best Resources for Transracial Parents

Where to Live As a Transracial Family

My Role as an Adoptive Mom in a Transracial Adoption

10 Ways to Celebrate Black History Month in Your Transracial Family

Choosing a School as a Transracial Adoptive Parent

How To Be A Transracial Parent

One Girl’s Perfect Response To Our Transracial Family At The Playground

Hard Truths that Adopted Children May Face in Transracial Adoption

8 Principles of Successful Transracial Parenting

6 Ways to Make Your Transracial Adoption Fail

Guides

“Transracial adoption isn’t for everyone. While many families appreciate the diversity, culture, and unique relationships that transracial adoption brings, parents who choose transracial adoption may find themselves grappling with opposition.” A Guide for Transracial Families to Instill Racial and Ethnic Pride

“Acknowledging your family’s differences and being prepared to respond to appropriate questions and comments, while calmly and confidently shutting down those peppered with racially charged language will go a long way in helping your family to grow together and make your way through the minefield that is the transracial adopted family.” Talking About Transracial Adoption: A Guide

Additional Articles

Transracial and Multicultural Adoption Guide

Hopeful Adoptive Parents and Transracial Adoption

“We pursued adoption. We wanted a family. We didn’t care what our children looked like. We felt that we would love any child of any race and we would be able to overcome the issues that may arise. We also felt that our adoption was in God’s hands and He would put in our path the children He wanted us to have. But we didn’t go into transracial adoption with our eyes closed.” Transracial Adoption: Am I Choosing It For The Right Reasons?

“Far too often we hear from white parents about how to raise their children of color; I cannot help but think this is entirely backwards. We are the ones needing to listen, seek out, and hear the voices of adults who are and were in our children’s shoes: children of color being raised in white families.” 10 Things You Should Know Before Adopting Transracially

Additional Articles

4 Ways To Prepare For a Successful Transracial Adoption

Transracial Adoption: A Family’s Experience and Advice to Those Considering Adopting Transracially

8 Lessons EVERY Parent Could Learn From Parents in Transracial Adoptions

How To Totally Mess Up Your Transracial Adoption

Top Three Things to Think About When Considering Transracial Adoption

5 Ways to Support Transracial Families in Adoption5 Things to Know about Transracial Adoption

Transracial Adoption Today

“I know my son will never see himself mirrored in my or my husband’s face. I know he will confront words of microaggression and gestures of blatant racism that I wish did not exist. And I know that he has experienced and will continue to experience a loss I will never know. But most importantly I know that when my family talks about race, ethnicity, and culture, it’s through an ongoing dialogue.” The Way We Think About Transracial and Transcultural Adoption Has Changed: Here’s How

”As a transcultural, transracial adoptive parent, one of my jobs is to educate. When people ask ‘How much did your kids cost?’ or ‘Why did their ‘real’ parents give them up?’ I have a bag of responses at the ready. But reflecting upon the Southwest Airlines incident, I realize I need to do a better job.” Reflections on the Southwest Airlines Incident

Additional Articles

‘Culturally Fluent Families’ Model Seeks to Help Parents and Kids in Transracial Adoptions

5 Things Not to Say to Mothers of Transracial Adoption

Racial Identity

“Adoptees, and especially a transracial adoptee, will experience many emotions that biological children do not have to face. They have a sense of loss—loss of identity, loss of knowing why they are like they are.” Navigating Multiple Identities: Transracial Adoption

Additional Articles

The Significance of Racial Identity in Transracially Adopted Young Adults

Transracial Adoptees

Listening to Transracial Adoptees

Transracial Adoption: Blind to Color