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Michelle MadridBranch
June 13, 2018
I’m not an adoption professional. What I am is an expert on how it feels to be adopted. I’m an international adoptee. I hold a wealth of knowledge and understanding about living in the skin of adoption. I was born in England. Not in London, but in a smaller place known as Bury St Edmunds. Bury St Edmunds is a town in West Suffolk on the River Lark. It is of an ancient ruin and is said to have been the site of a Roman villa and later a royal Saxon town. Bury St Edmunds is named for Saint Edmund—king of the East Angles—killed by the Danes around 870, and is buried there. I tell you this not because I’m a historian, but because I hold a deep sense of pride in where I am from and from where I was adopted. My bio mother delivered me into this world on a cold January morning. My bio father wasn’t at the delivery. He didn’t see the tears my mum cried; tears streaked with the heavy emotion of a mother preparing to relinquish her daughter to foster care. I wasn’t taken from my mum there at the little hospital in Bury St Edmunds. No, Mum cared for me for several days after my birth. Imagine, holding your baby, rocking your little one to sleep, touching tender-soft skin, smelling the sweet scent of your new child—all along knowing there would soon be a difficult goodbye. Imagine, feeling the touch of your mother and then having that taken from you. A child remembers these things, from a central and core place within. The severing is never forgotten. From the arms of my bio mother, I was placed into the arms of my foster mother. I have notes from my foster mother that I read to this day. Notes that are written in blue ink, on soft blue paper, neatly folded and placed into matching envelopes. My foster mother wrote of how I didn’t like my baths but loved being outside. She noted that I seemed to be content dressed in the beautiful sweaters and booties that my bio mother had knitted, during the months that I grew inside of her. My foster mother’s role was a temporary one, but also a critical one—offering stability and love to children like me who didn’t yet have a family to call their own. I’m told that she shed a tear when I was taken from her care. I’m told that she said she would miss me. Read full blogpost, here: http://michellemadridbranch.com/honoring-bio-foster-and-adoptive-mothers/ [img]https://adoption.com/community/PF.Base/file/attachment/2018/06/9fc3671cdf6824c096cceba699188de9_view.jpg[/img]

May 20, 2018
I was born in the Philippines in 1976 and adopted by an American military couple stationed at Clark Air Force Base (at the time of my adoption). I'm looking for my biological parents (which I do have this information- not sure of the creditable information). Does anyone know if there is a way to locate someone in the Philippines? I'm not sure if they are still alive. I also had older (2) siblings, according to one of many birth certificates. In addition, I would like to located them as well; however, I have no information on them. I would appreciate any information anyone might have. Thank you in advance.

May 11, 2018
Last fall I bought a 23andMe DNA for my wife as an anniversary gift. In March (about 7 weeks ago)she and her birth mother made first contact. We spent a lot of time chatting on the phone and skype. Then she came with her partner to visit and everything changed. They've been gone about 10 days and our house is now on the market and all of our things are being sold. My wife is moving in with her mom (in a different state) and I'm left out in the cold. She says that she just doesn't care about anything other than being with her mom. She doesn't know if she wants to be with me anymore, this is her entire life now. They won't engage with me at all and I just can't understand what I've done to make them hate me so much. No one has spoken to me or told me any reasons. I don't know what to do now. I am trying so hard to be understanding, but how can she throw away our marriage for something that she does not yet know? I would never try to come in between them, I just wanted some time with her too. I have tried to be supportive and I still do. I make myself scarce when they are talking and try not be pushy with any questions or demands, but I'm afraid my marriage is over. What do I do?

Michelle MadridBranch
May 9, 2018
“We cannot become what we need to be by remaining what we are.” ~Oprah Winfrey We live on a planet plagued by crisis. War, hunger, disease, exploitation, racism, gun violence—these are just a few of the headlines presented, daily, on news outlets worldwide. It’s seldom when we hear on our televisions, or read on our news tablets, of the crisis that I advocate on behalf of: the orphan crisis. This crisis has placed its grip on an estimated 17.8 million children around the globe: orphaned and vulnerable children in need of our care and attention. And, where there are orphaned and vulnerable children—there are also vulnerable and marginalized mothers. The continent of Africa is geographically some ten-thousand miles away from where I live, in California. Yet, the very heart of Africa is snuggled next to me, and sleeping, as I write these words. My daughter was once one of the 17.8 million orphaned children in the world. She was born in Ethiopia. In 2010, when she was 10-months old, I became her mother. There is no sweeter gift than being the woman that my girl calls Mommy. Through her zest for life, I have learned to expand the horizons of my own capabilities. My daughter sees no limits to what she can accomplish in her life—no boundaries on her dreams. Every girl, every woman, should feel just as free and empowered! The truth is—they don’t. Women and girls remain vulnerable in countless corners of the world. Mothers are crying, dying, exploited, exposed, marginalized and left with little choice but to orphan their children. The exploitation and discrimination of women and girls are directly impacting an ever-growing orphan crisis. If the numbers of desperate, abandoned, and orphaned children are on the increase, so too are the numbers of desperate, abandoned, and isolated mothers. The two are intricately interwoven. Read full blogpost, here: http://michellemadridbranch.com/helping-mothers-rise-addressing-the-root-cause-of-the-orphan-crisis/ [img]https://adoption.com/community/PF.Base/file/attachment/2018/05/783f9b255655b2a35ef7826f9b7803e1_view.jpg[/img]

April 18, 2018
Hello! My name is Morgan and my significant others name is Andrew. We are unable to have children naturally and are looking to adopt! We are on waiting lists now but have been told it can take many years so we are hoping to find someone willing to do a private adoption possibly! Thanks for reading and hope to hear from you soon! E mail mmmmmmorgs@icloud.com

April 8, 2018
We are Mara & James from NY and we are hoping to grow our family 1 more time through adoption. Our family includes a stay at home mom, a devoted hard working dad and two 5 year olds who are hoping for a baby brother or sister. We are hoping to meet an expectant mom looking to make an adoption plan through our own connections and networking and appreciate everyone's help in liking and sharing our posts. jamesandmara2adopt@gmail.com www.jamesandmara2adopt.wordpress.com facebook.com/wehope2adopt call us toll free: 844-279-6652 https://mybabysfamily.com/JamesandMara

April 4, 2018
I am looking for a male coparent for stepparent adoption . The father of my newborn son who is only a few days old has left me once I told him I was pregnant. I would like to find a loving father who does not have the ability to have his own children to be a father to my son. I would like to keep my role as his mother as i love him very much. My son can live between both households and we can share custody once a relationship is established as his father.

Michelle MadridBranch
March 29, 2018
I’m an international adoptee. I’m also the parent of two children delivered into my life via adoption from Russia and Ethiopia. We’re an international family created through adoption. We love each other and we have so much fun together. We are also Americans; immigrants to the U.S. and citizens by naturalization. We contribute and we serve this nation, our community, our family, and our friends. Recently, I read a staggering statistic: International adoption by Americans has declined by 81% since 2004. And, crippling new policies and practices are projected to completely end international adoption within the next five years. (How to Solve the U.S. International Adoption Crisis, by Nathan Gwilliam, Ron Stoddart, Robin Sizemore, and Tom Velie, adoption.com, March 19, 2018) I couldn’t believe my eyes! Is international adoption really in danger of ending for Americans by 2022? If so, how have we arrived at this dark hour? Furthermore, who are we as a country if we are willing to risk the possibility that orphaned children around the world might not have a place to call home, in America? UNICEF estimates that 15.1 million orphans around the world have lost both of their parents. According to the adoption.com article that I noted above, “International adoptions by U.S. adoptive parents decreased from 22,989 in 2004 to 5,370 in 2016. We believe international adoptions dropped to about 4,600 in 2017 (although the 2017 total has not yet been publicly released). The director of IAAME, the new Accrediting Entity, stated they are working under an assumption of only 4,200 intercountry adoptions in 2018. This is an 81% decline in international adoptions by Americans. If this trend line continues, international adoptions will completely end by 2022.” Why is this happening? Let me quote another leading voice in the adoption community, Former United States Senator and former Co-Chair of the Congressional Coalition on Adoption, Mary Landrieu, who recently said, “Congress passed the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption believing that this action would pave the way for a more ethical, transparent and streamlined process for inter-country adoption… Sadly, several years later, it is clear that this decision was a tragic mistake. Instead of shoring up the process and providing support for sending countries, the State Department has twisted the intent of the treaty to close one country after another. The process has become far more cumbersome and far less transparent. American parents who want to help and lovingly raise a child are often made to feel like criminals. As a result, intercountry adoptions have fallen to an historic low, and they continue to decrease each year as the need of desperate, abandoned, and orphaned children increases. Major change is required now before it’s too late.” The Office of Children’s Issues (OCI) says that they are implementing a “re-interpretation of adoption regulations” in order to protect children from child trafficking. Yet, within this push to re-interpret policies and practices, is the OCI ignoring the negative impact on the children who were not able to be adopted into loving and permanent families? Read the full article: http://michellemadridbranch.com/saving-international-adoption/ [img]https://adoption.com/community/PF.Base/file/attachment/2018/03/f6e0910d1c4d8894a760db50aa9c348f_view.jpg[/img]

March 21, 2018
I AM LOOKING FOR MY SON DEREK ALAN ZIMMERMAN HE WAS BORN JUNE 25TH 1987 IN WINFIELD KANSAS TO TROY ZIMMERMAN AND SHARON PENNINGTON HE WELL BE 31 YRS OLD THIS YR I MISS HIM SO MUCH AND I LOVE HIM SO MUCH JUST HAVE SO MUCH TO TELL HIM THAT IT WAS NOT MY FALUT ABOUT THE ADOPTION