Adopting from Suriname

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Source: cia.gov.

Map
Source: cia.gov.

Map
Source: cia.gov.

Arya Dewaker Temple, Paramaribo
Source: Wikipedia.org.


Notice: As of July 14, 2014, all individuals and agencies facilitating international adoptions must be in compliance with the Intercountry Universal Accreditation Act.

The information contained on this website is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional legal advice. Always seek the advice of a licensed and qualified professional. While the content of this website is frequently updated, information changes rapidly and therefore, some information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies, omissions or typographical errors.


About Suriname

First explored by the Spaniards in the 16th century and then settled by the English in the mid-17th century, Suriname became a Dutch colony in 1667. With the abolition of African slavery in 1863, workers were brought in from India and Java. Independence from the Netherlands was granted in 1975. Five years later the civilian government was replaced by a military regime that soon declared a socialist republic. It continued to exert control through a succession of nominally civilian administrations until 1987, when international pressure finally forced a democratic election. In 1990, the military overthrew the civilian leadership, but a democratically elected government - a four-party coalition - returned to power in 1991. The coalition expanded to eight parties in 2005 and ruled until August 2010, when voters returned former military leader Desire BOUTERSE and his opposition coalition to power.


Hague Convention Information

Suriname is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption(Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Hague countries are processed in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Section 204.3 as it relates to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F).


Below is the limited adoption information that the Department has obtained from the adoption authority of Suriname, the Bureau of Family Rights and Affairs. U.S. citizens interested in adopting children from Suriname should contact the Bureau of Family Rights and Affairs to inquire about applicable laws and procedures. U.S. citizen prospective adoptive parents living in Suriname, who would like to adopt a child from the United States or from a third country should also contact Suriname’s adoption authority. See contact information below.


Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are adoptable. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.


The nearest immigrant visa-issuing embassy is the U.S. Embassy in Georgetown, Guyana. Please visit the Department of State’s Country Specific Information for more information on travelling to Suriname and the U.S. Embassy in Georgetown, Guyana’s website for information on consular services. You can also contact the U.S. Embassy in Georgetown at visageorge@state.gov. Note that prospective adoptive parents must submit the panel physician’s medical report on the child as part of the immigrant visa application.


SOURCE

Intercountry Adoption, Bureau of Consular Affairs. U.S. Department of State Country Information[1]