Adopting from Italy

The official flag.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

Map
Source: cia.gov.

The Colosseum in Rome.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Southern .
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Venice.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Florence.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Vineyards in the Chianti region.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

The Leaning Tower of Pisa.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Collage of Venice.
Source: Wikipedia.org.


Notice: As of July 14, 2014, all individuals and agencies facilitating international adoptions must be in compliance with the Intercountry Universal Accreditation Act.


About Italy

Italy became a nation-state in 1861 when the regional states of the peninsula, along with Sardinia and Sicily, were united under King Victor EMMANUEL II. An era of parliamentary government came to a close in the early 1920s when Benito MUSSOLINI established a Fascist dictatorship. His alliance with Nazi Germany led to Italy's defeat in World War II. A democratic republic replaced the monarchy in 1946 and economic revival followed. To learn more please read About Italy.


Hague Convention Information

Italy is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore all adoptions between Italy and the United States must meet the requirements of the Convention and U.S. law implementing the Convention.


Adoptions from Italy are rare. Only two Italian orphans have received U.S. immigrant visas in the past five fiscal years. The information provided is intended primarily to assist in these rare cases, including adoptions of Italian children by relatives in the United States, as well as adoptions from third countries by Americans living in Italy.


Who Can Adopt

Adoption between the United States and Italy is governed by the Hague Adoption Convention. Therefore to adopt from Italy, you must first be found eligible to adopt by the U.S. Government. For more information please read about Who Can Adopt from Italy.


Who Can Be Adopted

Because Italy is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, children from Italy must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for adoption. To learn more please read about Who Can Be Adopted from Italy.


How to Adopt

Adoption Authority

Italy's Adoption Authority

Commissione per le Adozioni Internazionali (Commission for Intercountry Adoption)

NOTE: City Juvenile Courts oversee the handling of adoption cases. For a complete listing of these courts, prospective adoptive parents should visit the following website.

The Process

Because Italy is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, adopting from Italy must follow a specific process designed to meet the Convention's requirements. A brief summary of the Convention adoption process is given below. You must complete these steps in the following order so that your adoption meets all necessary legal requirements.


NOTE: If you filed your I-600a with Italy before April 1, 2008, the Hague Adoption Convention may not apply to your adoption. Your adoption could continue to be processed in accordance with the immigration regulations for non-Convention adoptions. Learn more.


  1. Choose an Accredited Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt
  3. Be Matched with a Child
  4. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Immigration to the United States
  5. Adopt the Child in Italy
  6. Bringing your Child Home

To learn more about this process please read How to Adopt from Italy.


Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

A valid U.S. passport is required to enter and leave Italy. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports. To learn more please read about Traveling Abroad in Italy.


After Adoption

What does Italy require of the adoptive parents after the adoption?

Italy has no requirements for the adoptive parents after the adoption requirements


What resources are available to assist families after the adoption?

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family -- whether it's another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.


Here are some good places to start your support group search:


Child Welfare Information Gateway

North American Council on Adoptable Children


NOTE: Inclusion of non-U.S. Government links does not imply endorsement of contents.


Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Italy

Address: Via Vittorio Veneto 121 - 00187 ROMA Tel: (switchboard): (+39) 06.46741 Fax: (+39) 06.4674.2244 Email: uscitizensrome@state.gov Internet: U.S. Embassy Italy


The United States also has Consulates General in Florence, Milan and Naples.


Italy's Adoption Authority

Commissione per le Adozioni Internazionali

(Commission for Intercountry Adoption) Largo Chigi, 19 00187 ROMA Telephone numbers: +39 (06) 6779 2060 / 66 / 68 Fax number: +39 (06) 6779 2165 e-mail: cai.segreteria-enti@palazzochigi.it Internet: Commission for Intercountry Adoption


NOTE: City Juvenile Courts oversee the handling of adoption cases. For a complete listing of these courts, prospective adoptive parents should visit the following website.


Embassy of Italy

Address:3000 Whitehaven Street, NW, Washington, DC 20008 Tel.: (202) 612-4400 Fax: (202) 518-2151 Internet: Embassy of Italy.


Italy also has consulates in: Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Philadelphia, and San Francisco.


Office of Children's Issues

U.S. Department of State CA/OCS/CI SA-17, 9th Floor Washington, DC 20522-1709 Tel: 1-888-407-4747 E-mail: AskCI@state.gov Internet: U.S. State Department


Source

Intercountry Adoption, Bureau of Consular Affairs. U.S. Department of State Country Information[1]