Adopting from Solomon Islands

The official flag.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

The official coat of arms.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Aerial view of the islands.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Children outside Tuo school, Fenualoa, Reef Islands.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

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Source: flickr.com.

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Source: flickr.com.

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Source: flickr.com.

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Source: Wikipedia.org.


Notice: As of July 14, 2014, all individuals and agencies facilitating international adoptions must be in compliance with the Intercountry Universal Accreditation Act.

The information contained on this website is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional legal advice. Always seek the advice of a licensed and qualified professional. While the content of this website is frequently updated, information changes rapidly and therefore, some information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies, omissions or typographical errors.


About Solomon Islands

The UK established a protectorate over the Solomon Islands in the 1890s. Some of the most bitter fighting of World War II occurred on this archipelago. Self-government was achieved in 1976 and independence two years later. Ethnic violence, government malfeasance, and endemic crime have undermined stability and civil society. In June 2003, then Prime Minister Sir Allan KEMAKEZA sought the assistance of Australia in reestablishing law and order; the following month, an Australian-led multinational force arrived to restore peace and disarm ethnic militias. The Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI) has generally been effective in restoring law and order and rebuilding government institutions.


Hague Convention Information

Solomon Islands is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption ( Hague Adoption Convention ). Therefore, when the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force for the United States on April 1, 2008, intercountry adoption processing for Solomon Islands did not change.


Solomon Islands law states that prospective adoptive parents who wish to adopt a child from the Solomon Islands MUST be domiciled in the Solomon Islands at the time of the adoption.

Who Can Adopt

To bring an adopted child to United States from Solomon Islands, you must be found eligible to adopt by the U.S. Government. The U.S. Government agency responsible for making this determination is the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). To learn more please read about Who Can Adopt from Solomon Islands.


Who Can Be Adopted

The Solomon Islands has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption. You cannot adopt a child in the Solomon Islands unless he or she meets multiple requirements. To learn more please read about Who Can Be Adopted from Solomon Islands.


How to Adopt

Adoption Authority

Solomon Islands Adoption Authority

High Court of the Solomon Islands


The Process

The process for adopting a child from the Solomon Islands generally includes the following steps:


  1. Choose an Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt
  3. Be Matched with a Child
  4. Adopt the Child (or Gain Legal Custody) in the Solomon Islands
  5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Adoption
  6. Bring Your Child Home

To learn more about this process please read How to Adopt from Solomon Islands.


Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

A valid U.S. passport is required to enter and leave Solomon Islands. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports. Getting or renewing a passport is easy. To learn more please read about Traveling Abroad in Solomon Islands.


After Adoption

What resources are available to assist families after the adoption?

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family -- whether it's another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.


Here are some good places to start your support group search:


Child Welfare Information Gateway

North American Council on Adoptable Children

Adoption Services Support Group for Adopting Persons


Contact Information

U.S. Embassy, Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea

Douglas Street, P.O. Box 1492, Port Moresby, N.C.D. 121, Papua New Guinea Tel: (675) 321-1455; Fax: (675) 321-1593. Email: ConsularPortMoresby@state.gov


The U.S. Embassy in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, has responsibility for the well-being of U.S. citizens in the Solomon Islands.


Permanent Representative of Solomon Islands to the United Nations

800 Second Avenue, Suite 400L, New York, NY 10017-4709 Tel: (212) 599-6192/6193, Fax: (212) 661-8925


The Solomon Islands do not have an embassy in Washington, D.C.

Office of Children's Issues

U.S. Department of State CA/OCS/CI SA-17, 9th Floor Washington, DC 20522-1709 Tel: 1-888-407-4747 E-mail: AskCI@state.gov Internet: U.S. Department of State


U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)

For questions about immigration procedures, call the National Customer Service Center (NCSC) 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)


SOURCE

Intercountry Adoption, Bureau of Consular Affairs. U.S. Department of State Country Information[1]