Advertisements

Adopting from Fiji

The official flag.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

Map.
Source: cia.gov.

Huts in the village of Navala in the Nausori Highlands.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Fijian children.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

'
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Sri Siva Temple.
Source: Wikipedia.org.

Fijians.
Source: Wikipedia.org.


Notice: As of July 14, 2014, all individuals and agencies facilitating international adoptions must be in compliance with the Intercountry Universal Accreditation Act.

The information contained on this website is for educational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional legal advice. Always seek the advice of a licensed and qualified professional. While the content of this website is frequently updated, information changes rapidly and therefore, some information may be out of date, and/or contain inaccuracies, omissions or typographical errors.


About Fiji

Fiji became independent in 1970 after nearly a century as a British colony. Democratic rule was interrupted by two military coups in 1987 caused by concern over a government perceived as dominated by the Indian community (descendants of contract laborers brought to the islands by the British in the 19th century). The coups and a 1990 constitution that cemented native Melanesian control of Fiji led to heavy Indian emigration; the population loss resulted in economic difficulties, but ensured that Melanesians became the majority. To learn more please read About Fiji.


Fiji Adoption Alert

There have been several adoption alerts for Fiji over the years. To learn more please read the Fiji Adoption Alert page.


Hague Convention Information

Fiji is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoption processing in Hague countries is done in accordance with the requirements of the Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA’s implementing regulations, as well as the implementing legislation and regulations of Fiji.


Intercountry adoption is not possible from Fiji at this time. For more information please see the related notice.


Who Can Adopt

To bring an adopted child to United States from Fiji, you must be found eligible to adopt by the U.S. Government. To learn more please read Who Can Adopt from Fiji.


Who Can Be Adopted

Fiji has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption. You cannot adopt a child in Fiji unless he or she meets these requirements. To learn more please read Who Can Be Adopted from Fiji.


How to Adopt

Adoption Authority

Fijian Adoption Authority

The Social Welfare Department, under the Ministry of Women, Social Welfare and Poverty, is in charge of overseeing intercountry adoptions. For people residing in Fiji, the adoption authority in Fiji is the Magistrate's court having jurisdiction over the adopted child's place of residence. Almost every town and city in Fiji has a court.


The Process

The process for adopting a child from Fiji generally includes the following steps:


  1. Choose an Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt
  3. Be Matched with a Child
  4. Adopt the Child (or Gain Legal Custody) in Fiji
  5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Adoption
  6. Bring Your Child Home

To learn more about this process please read How to Adopt from Fiji.


Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. To learn more please read Traveling Abroad in Fiji.


After Adoption

What does Fiji require of the adoptive parents after the adoption?

We strongly urge you to comply with the wish of Fiji and complete all post-adoption requirements in a timely manner. Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process. Your cooperation will contribute to that country's history of positive experiences with American parents.


What resources are available to assist families after the adoption?

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family -- whether it's another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.


Here are some good places to start your support group search:


Adoption Services Support Groups for Adopting Persons

North American Council on Adoptable Children


NOTE: Inclusion of non-U.S. Government links does not imply endorsement of contents.


Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Fiji

Embassy of the United States, Suva, Fiji 158 Princes Road, Tamavua Suva, Fiji Tel: (679) 331-4466 Fax: (679) 330-2267 Recorded Information: (679) 330-3888 Email: consularsuva@state.gov Internet: U.S. Embassy Fiji


Fijian Adoption Authority

Social Welfare Department P.O. Box 2127 Government Buildings 72 Suva Street, Toorak Suva, Fiji Tel: (679) 331-5585


Embassy of Fiji

Embassy of the Republic of the Fiji Islands, Washington, D.C. 2000 M Street, NW Suite 710 Washington, D.C. 20036 Tel: 202- 466-8320 Fax: 202- 466-8325 Email: info@fijiembassydc.com Internet: [www.fijiembassydc.com Embassy of Fiji]


Office of Children’s Issues

U.S. Department of State CA/OCS/CI USA-17, 9th Floor Washington, DC 20522-1709 Tel: 1-888-407-4747 E-mail: AskCI@state.gov Internet: U.S. Department of State


U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)

For questions about immigration procedures, call the National Customer Service Center (NCSC) 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833) Internet: USCIS


For questions about filing a Form I-800A or I-800 petition:

National Benefits Center Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local) Email: NBC.Adoptions@DHS.gov

SOURCE

Intercountry Adoption, Bureau of Consular Affairs. U.S. Department of State Country Information[1]

Advertisements