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April 18, 2018
Hello! My name is Morgan and my significant others name is Andrew. We are unable to have children naturally and are looking to adopt! We are on waiting lists now but have been told it can take many years so we are hoping to find someone willing to do a private adoption possibly! Thanks for reading and hope to hear from you soon! E mail mmmmmmorgs@icloud.com

April 8, 2018
We are Mara & James from NY and we are hoping to grow our family 1 more time through adoption. Our family includes a stay at home mom, a devoted hard working dad and two 5 year olds who are hoping for a baby brother or sister. We are hoping to meet an expectant mom looking to make an adoption plan through our own connections and networking and appreciate everyone's help in liking and sharing our posts. jamesandmara2adopt@gmail.com www.jamesandmara2adopt.wordpress.com facebook.com/wehope2adopt call us toll free: 844-279-6652 https://mybabysfamily.com/JamesandMara

April 4, 2018
I am looking for a male coparent for stepparent adoption . The father of my newborn son who is only a few days old has left me once I told him I was pregnant. I would like to find a loving father who does not have the ability to have his own children to be a father to my son. I would like to keep my role as his mother as i love him very much. My son can live between both households and we can share custody once a relationship is established as his father.

Michelle MadridBranch
March 29, 2018
I’m an international adoptee. I’m also the parent of two children delivered into my life via adoption from Russia and Ethiopia. We’re an international family created through adoption. We love each other and we have so much fun together. We are also Americans; immigrants to the U.S. and citizens by naturalization. We contribute and we serve this nation, our community, our family, and our friends. Recently, I read a staggering statistic: International adoption by Americans has declined by 81% since 2004. And, crippling new policies and practices are projected to completely end international adoption within the next five years. (How to Solve the U.S. International Adoption Crisis, by Nathan Gwilliam, Ron Stoddart, Robin Sizemore, and Tom Velie, adoption.com, March 19, 2018) I couldn’t believe my eyes! Is international adoption really in danger of ending for Americans by 2022? If so, how have we arrived at this dark hour? Furthermore, who are we as a country if we are willing to risk the possibility that orphaned children around the world might not have a place to call home, in America? UNICEF estimates that 15.1 million orphans around the world have lost both of their parents. According to the adoption.com article that I noted above, “International adoptions by U.S. adoptive parents decreased from 22,989 in 2004 to 5,370 in 2016. We believe international adoptions dropped to about 4,600 in 2017 (although the 2017 total has not yet been publicly released). The director of IAAME, the new Accrediting Entity, stated they are working under an assumption of only 4,200 intercountry adoptions in 2018. This is an 81% decline in international adoptions by Americans. If this trend line continues, international adoptions will completely end by 2022.” Why is this happening? Let me quote another leading voice in the adoption community, Former United States Senator and former Co-Chair of the Congressional Coalition on Adoption, Mary Landrieu, who recently said, “Congress passed the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption believing that this action would pave the way for a more ethical, transparent and streamlined process for inter-country adoption… Sadly, several years later, it is clear that this decision was a tragic mistake. Instead of shoring up the process and providing support for sending countries, the State Department has twisted the intent of the treaty to close one country after another. The process has become far more cumbersome and far less transparent. American parents who want to help and lovingly raise a child are often made to feel like criminals. As a result, intercountry adoptions have fallen to an historic low, and they continue to decrease each year as the need of desperate, abandoned, and orphaned children increases. Major change is required now before it’s too late.” The Office of Children’s Issues (OCI) says that they are implementing a “re-interpretation of adoption regulations” in order to protect children from child trafficking. Yet, within this push to re-interpret policies and practices, is the OCI ignoring the negative impact on the children who were not able to be adopted into loving and permanent families? Read the full article: http://michellemadridbranch.com/saving-international-adoption/ [img]https://adoption.com/community/PF.Base/file/attachment/2018/03/f6e0910d1c4d8894a760db50aa9c348f_view.jpg[/img]

March 21, 2018
I AM LOOKING FOR MY SON DEREK ALAN ZIMMERMAN HE WAS BORN JUNE 25TH 1987 IN WINFIELD KANSAS TO TROY ZIMMERMAN AND SHARON PENNINGTON HE WELL BE 31 YRS OLD THIS YR I MISS HIM SO MUCH AND I LOVE HIM SO MUCH JUST HAVE SO MUCH TO TELL HIM THAT IT WAS NOT MY FALUT ABOUT THE ADOPTION

March 19, 2018
I MOHAMMED SUHAIL M A, AGED 27,FAMILY CARE ISN'T FRIENDLY,MOTHER USED TO TORTURE ME.MOTHER DENYING RIGHT MEDICAL CARE.MOTHER NEVER TAKES TO DOCTOR.WHEN TALKED ABOUT A JOB IN ABROAD MY MOTHER SAID I WILL MAKE SURE THAT YOU REMAIN HERE IN HOME COUNTRY.WHEN APPROACHED DOCTOR MOTHER RESISTED ME DENIED ME PROPER FOOD AND SLEEP.SEVERAL PERSONNEL APPROACHED IN REGARD OF THIS MATTER SHE ACTED NORMALLY AND WHEN THE TIME COMES MOTHER USED TO TORTURE BOTH PHYSICALLY AND MENTALLY.MOTHER DENIED ME HIGHER EDUCATION.SHE USED TO MAKE UGLY COMMENTS ON MY PHYSICAL APPEARENCE.I AM FACING SLEEPING DISORDER. THIS AIN'T HORSEPLAY.I HAVE NO WHERE ELSE TO GO.SO KINDLY TAKE IT FROM ME WAITING FOR A LOVELY FAMILY AND WAITING FOR A HOPE KINDLY KEEP THE CONFIDENTIALITY EMAIL REGD: MOHAMMEDSUHAILMA7886@GMAIL.COM NATIONALITY : INDIAN COUNTRY: INDIA STATE : KERALA DISTRICT :ERNAKULAM CITY : COCHIN STATE : KERALA HOLDING ALL VALID DOCUMENT IN HAND KINDLY KEEP THE CONFIDENTIALITY [img]https://adoption.com/community/PF.Base/file/attachment/2018/03/aa50c0ac175fea673bf88db76543e10e_view.jpg[/img][img]https://adoption.com/community/PF.Base/file/attachment/2018/03/c374de7f767c0932243dd3a558febe9e_view.jpg[/img][img]https://adoption.com/community/PF.Base/file/attachment/2018/03/2923079dc0c7a58467e716d414bbeff0_view.jpg[/img] [img]https://adoption.com/community/PF.Base/file/attachment/2018/03/e55a5d6260569121c433f7c942d62faa_view.jpg[/img] [img]https://adoption.com/community/PF.Base/file/attachment/2018/03/1f504a2d5633978139cea94c32862d03_view.jpg[/img]

March 13, 2018
At seventeen years old, I feel I know enough about my adoption to share my knowledge and experience with others. I was adopted at a mere age of a few months, where my adoption was arranged prior to my birth through an agency. I am very fortunate in my situation to have a close relationship with my birth mum. I grew up knowing her, where she lived in the same country as me for seven years of my life and I now annually travel to the Gold Coast to stay with her in my school holidays. I see her a few times a year, where she ultimately feels like family. I have two half brothers on her side, both of which are much older (25 and 33); I am an aunty to the three kids of my oldest brother. I also have a younger brother (15), who my adoptive parents conceived after my adoption. I don't ever remember being formally sat down at a young age and told by either my adoptive nor biological parents that I was adopted. I am actually unsure of how I developed an understanding of my adoption at a young age, however, I do know that it was the smoothest way to come to grips with the concept. For most people who remain within their biological families, family holds a significant place in their lives. For myself, however, and numerous adoptees worldwide, you'll find that family is less of a significance to us. It's not that I don't desire this feeling of belonging, I've simply never experienced it to the extent of which others around me do. My relationship with my adoptive mother is tense; where I doubt this would change if she was my biological mother. This does not mean to say, however, that I am suppressed by my adoptive family against reaching my potential or full capabilities. I am very privileged to possess the ability of attending a prestigious school, participating in overseas sporting trips, travelling and being provided with financial support. However, I am not quite privileged enough to feel any strong connection or love towards my adoptive parents. I do feel a connection to my birth mum's side; however, with my noticeable absence from years of their lives it isn't strong enough to say I feel an overwhelming sense of belonging. I have spent countless nights mulling over details of which I lack profusely in regards to my origin (especially from my biological father's side). As a result of this, I finally decided to contact my birth father at the age of fifteen. After extensively scouring the internet with a mere first name, last name and hometown (of which I guessed), I finally managed to stumble upon a mobile number. Unsure if this number even belonged to him, I sent a text; I hoped to simply receive confirmation towards the existence of the person who provided me with half of my genetic make up. I received a reply within minutes of contacting him, where I was assured that I had not been forgotten. I also discovered upon contacting him of two half sisters I have on his side (25 and 31), a revelation of which came as a rather large shock. When people now ask me if I have any siblings, my simple answer is "a younger brother". If I want a more elaborate conversation, however, you'll find my response is something along the lines of "five and counting". There hasn't really been follow through since initially contacting my birth father in August 2016. I have sent multiple texts asking to meet him, where in turn I receive a similar excuse. I have now given up trying to initiate a meeting, where the extent of our contact consists of a birthday text to me each year with again the assurance that I have "not been forgotten". This situation does frustrate me, however, recently I have realised there is no desperate need to meet my birth father. After disappearing from my life when I was four years old, an absence of thirteen years is one I feel would restrict the salvaging of any relationship we may have. To my friends who read this, you will know that I am open about my situation and am not hesitant to answer your questions to the best of my ability. You will not fully understand the nature of adoption, nor the feelings adoptees possess regarding their individual situations. That's ok. Regardless of your levels of understanding, I am so thankful to have you beautiful people in my lives. Please remember your willingness to listen is worth more than enough, where if I talk to you I do not at all expect advice; I understand the concept is difficult to depict - even I get confused! My friends are essentially the closest people to family I have, I thank you all with all my heart for your love and support over my seventeen years. This is not to say though, that my adoption was an overall failure. To say an adoption only affects the adoptee is incorrect. It allowed my adoptive parents, who had been trying for a baby for several years, to finally welcome a child (legally) of their own into their lives. In addition to this, my birth mum can utilise her title of being a mother to me without the complications that would have arisen if my adoption had not occurred. It may not be an ideal situation for myself, however, a beneficial outcome for multiple people is more worthwhile than that for one person. It is hard to imagine what my life would be like if I wasn't adopted, where mostly I try not to think about it extensively. I am immensely grateful for the life I have now and will admit it is not an experience without difficulty. However, I appreciate this would be exactly the same for my potential life if I had not been adopted. Imperfection is necessary. It is unclear whether I will be able to discover more about my adoption. What I am beginning to discover, however, is that being an adoptee is more than simply a label. Adoption is a concept of which is unique to every case. Generalisation of this concept would be incorrect and misleading. However, that is not to say that adoptees significantly differ from each other. It is very easy for an adoptee to fall into the trap of believing they are alone. Hence, I am constantly reminding myself of the ultimate privilege I possess in belonging to a community of open minded, relatable people of whom I feel connected to without needing to physically meet them. This community, combined with my friends and some birth family provide me with the closest feeling to belonging that I am capable of experiencing. Adoption is hard; unique; complicated. However, with the constant love and support of those who I do connect with, I continue to be inspired everyday to appreciate my life after adoption.

Michelle MadridBranch
February 23, 2018
Perfect people. Perfect Children. Perfect Parents. Perfect homes. Perfect lives. Perfect families. The images are everywhere in the media today. I’m standing at my local grocery store checkout counter and staring at magazine covers with the images of perfect humans, perfect outfits, perfect bodies for those outfits, perfect places to travel, and perfect cars to get you there. I, on the other hand, have my hair up in a mommy bun and my glasses are a little crooked on my nose. As I look down in an attempt to straighten my eyewear, I see clearly that I — in my hurried attempt to get my kids to school on time — left the house with my furry slippers still on my feet. I’m not perfect. The thought of perfection actually stresses me out. It causes me anxiety. Having to live up to someone else’s expectations for who I am and how I should show up in this world is, well, daunting. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve tried it. I have jumped — head first — into the unforgiving waters of perfection. I nearly drowned. Perfection isn’t real. It’s a facáde created to sell stuff to the masses who have fallen into the false belief that perfection is somehow possible. The pressure to be perfect can be felt within our families. And, for families created through adoption, the pressure of perfection can be of a constant nature. Here are three reasons why I believe we must reject perfection as a standard for adoptive families... Follow this link to read more: http://michellemadridbranch.com/3-reasons-to-reject-perfection-adoptive-families/ [img]https://adoption.com/community/PF.Base/file/attachment/2018/02/e6a8257ca0d8615ff9779bd333463e16_view.jpg[/img]

February 21, 2018
This is my story (the short, 1,000 word version). I've published it on my own personal blog, so I will just link it here so as not to have the content showing up in two separate places on the web. For context, my son is now eight years old. Though it is an open adoption, the pain and trauma of this experience has led me to stop visiting all together. We will reconnect when he is 18, if he wants to. [img]https://adoption.com/community/PF.Base/file/attachment/2018/02/c2e6aaede34caf14032a93aa19a0311d_view.jpg[/img] https://freeupyourplate.com/2018/02/21/i-gave-up-my-baby-for-adoption/

February 15, 2018
Two years ago I stood in St Peters Square surrounded by one hundred thousand people to witness the canonization of the Saint of the Gutters. The atmosphere was electric, palpable, and as Pope Francis pronounced her a Saint, I had goosebumps and tears in my eyes. It was a very special moment, not just because here we were witnessing something momentous, but because, Mother Teresa has personally touched me and my family. Those ripples she talks about in the quote above, well one of them was me. Let me tell you my story. I must been about six years old when I first met Mother Teresa and visited Sishu Bhavan in Calcutta. Though the memory is now clouded, the visit left a big imprint, so much so that I was drawn back frequently. Initially I would beg my parents to take me back there whenever we transited through Calcutta. As I grew older and we moved around, we always found a Mother Teresa home close by to visit. The habit continued even when I left home to join university. You see, the big attraction was the babies. I was born with an inherent gene that made me hopelessly madly in love with babies. And so I could spend hours there, helping feed them, or carry them or just watch other people feed and carry them and I would be contented. My heart would bleed to think that here were babies who were abandoned and if I thought I could have gotten away with it, I would have happily smuggled some of them home. But of course I knew I couldn’t. Instead I decided that as soon as I could, I would adopt a baby. I must say here though, that yes, initially it was all about the babies, but later it was also about so much more. Mother Teresa’s example of selfless love and service to humanity touched my family to a great extent. My parents themselves were altruistic and we grew up watching, learning and soon practicing ourselves, just how to live our faith and give back to the community with our time or whatever other resources we had to share. Well, I grew up, like most little girls do. Many other childhood dreams and ambitions were forgotten or deemed silly, but this one desire kept burning bright. In my final year of university, I met my prince charming and quite soon into our relationship I dragged him one Saturday afternoon to spend time with the babies. He was a trooper. He got that this was a big deal to me. Over the next few years we talked about adoption a lot. He listened patiently, asked questions and brought up concerns. But my battle plans were drawn and I was well prepared with facts and testimonies. I took him to more orphanages and adoption workshops. I read him excerpts of books. I knew one hundred percent that we could love a child we had not conceived as much as one that had grown in my belly. To be honest though, he didn’t need much convincing. We made a pact. We would have biological children, and adopt one too. We had our first child a year after getting married and the pregnancy and parenthood was everything and more than we had imagined. Life was perfect. We treasured each milestone and enjoyed watching our first born grow. Around the time she started school we knew the time had come to plan for baby number two. We began the initial paperwork required for adoption and the wait began. Though shorter, it was every bit as exciting as the nine months of pregnancy. We looked for names and prepared our families and friends. Our immediate families were very supportive but we did meet with many who asked, “But why, when you have your own?” Most often we just smiled and just said “Because we want to”. And so at 28, my lifelong dream came true and on July 27th 2003, we brought Ryeika Teresa, all of two months old, into our hearts and lives. As I held her that first time, the tears flowed freely. We looked at her angelic face, the sparkling eyes and felt such a gut wrenching tug of emotion (the good kind). We were so blessed to have been given the honor of being her parents. Her name Ryeika means ‘unique’ and Teresa is for the little bent lady, the one in the blue and white sari who held hundreds of babies in her arms, who fought for their right to live. She believed that they were all, each and every one of them a gift from God. In the next couple of years we went on to have two more biological children and today I am the proud mother of four girls. Life is full, I am blessed and the circle of life continues. I feel so lucky to have had the opportunity to attend the canonization ceremony with my husband and our four girls. I feel blessed that Ryeika was able to witness the person who inspired her parents, who delivered her into our hearts, be proclaimed a Saint. I have read some disheartening articles in the media recently criticizing Mother Teresa. While I cannot but agree that perhaps some of her practices were outdated and her dogma could be perceived as harsh, the simple truth is that she helped scores and scores of people. She gave dignity to the dying. She set up hospitals and schools in areas of the world where life has little value, and built safe havens for babies of unwed mothers or women who, because of poverty or other circumstances had to leave their children at her doorstep. I have seen personally how the nuns from her order look after the aged, the sick, the HIV positive, the children with deformities and I wonder, if they did not do it, then who? I have met so many of her nuns, Europeans, Americans, Asians, Africans; brilliant, well educated, charismatic women, who could have had great careers and the world at their feet. And yet they chose to give up all that and wear the blue and white, dedicating their lives to service and simplicity of a whole different kind. And the beauty about them was that they were all so happy and contented. In spite of tough conditions and bone tiring work, they were always cheerful. I till date have never met a grumpy Mother Teresa nun. So perhaps more than all the work and charity and selfless giving that Mother Teresa did, day in and day out, what marks her for sainthood, is the influence she has had on a plethora of people. People who, inspired by her example, were prompted to go out and make a difference, be kind, lend a ear, pray or do a little bit of charity and change somebody’s life in whatever small way. The ripples....some small, some big, but all so very significant. Saint Teresa of Calcutta, yes you cast the stone across the waters. So glad one ripple touched me. You inspired me. You touched my life. Thank You. To read our full adoption story, pick up my personal memoir, now out on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/Little-Girls-Dream-Letter-Daughter-ebook/dp/B0785S5HL8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1518092023&sr=8-1&keywords=sanchita+lobo #adoption #special needs